black holes and time warps pdf free download

black holes and time warps pdf free download

In consultation with theoretical physicists, it became apparent that the only sensible explanation for these sources were extremely large black holes residing in the cores of galaxies, producing intense radiation as they fed and, in the case of quasars , blasting out incredibly powerful jets of material in opposite directions, heating the surrounding galactic gas until it glowed in radio frequencies.

Thorne describes the much less mature search for gravitational waves , phenomena predicted to result from supernovae and black hole collisions, but as yet unobserved in and, indeed, not directly observed until , a discovery that led to Thorne being awarded a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics.

In the s came Stephen Hawking 's startling prediction of black hole evaporation, powered by quantum fluctuations near the event horizon. Toward the end of the text, Thorne deals with the much more speculative question of the nature of the core of a black hole; the so-called gravitational singularity predicted by Einstein's field equations.

By introducing quantum behavior to curved spacetime , several physicists have suggested that black holes do not possess a true mathematical singularity, but rather a region of chaotic space, in which time does not exist. The behavior of this space and the material which approaches it are not well understood, with a complete marriage of relativity and quantum physics yet to be achieved. In the final chapter, Thorne delves into even more speculative matters relating to black hole physics, including the existence and nature of wormholes and time machines.

The book features a foreword by Stephen Hawking and an introduction by Frederick Seitz. In addition to the main text, the book provides biographical summaries of the major scientists in the text, a chronology of key events in the history of black hole physics, a glossary of technical terms, twenty-three pages of notes, a bibliography, and alphabetical indices of subjects and people referred to in the text.

Of the book, The New York Times wrote, "the close and sometimes difficult reasoning it embodies is lightened by a deft, anecdotal approach, and by the author's whimsical drawings and diagrams. Thorne in fact is strongest for the novice reader when dealing with the history of the physics community". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

You've come to the right place. Thorne has done an excellent job of putting just about anything you'd want to know about the topic in layman's terms, but the math and physics is also there if you want it. He blends the science and the history together and comes up with an interesting read not only about what we know about stellar death, but how we got there. In the last chapter he presents some of his own Want to learn what happens to stars when they die, but you lack a post-doc in astrophysics?

In the last chapter he presents some of his own research on how black holes may be used to create time traveling wormholes. You don't get much cooler than time-traveling wormholes. View all 3 comments. Dec 14, Jose Moa rated it it was amazing Shelves: physics , science , astronomy , cosmology.

Kip S. Thorne is one of the most important researchers in gravity and black holes. I this book,after a introductin as a sf short tale where a spaceship goes to the evet horizon of different sizes of black holes to investigate,the author explains clearly the principle of relativity is to say that the physical laws are the same in all inertial reference frames,this priciple is the origin of the special relativity theory the special relativity theory could have been discovered many years before bec Kip S.

I this book,after a introductin as a sf short tale where a spaceship goes to the evet horizon of different sizes of black holes to investigate,the author explains clearly the principle of relativity is to say that the physical laws are the same in all inertial reference frames,this priciple is the origin of the special relativity theory the special relativity theory could have been discovered many years before because the Maxwell equation for a electromagnetic wave is invariant under Lorentz transformations and not in galilean transformations,in this sense the electromagnetic theory by Maxwell is the first classic field relativistic theory second the equivalence principle that is the origin of the generl theory of relativity where the spacetime is curved by the presence of matter and energy and the light follows geodesics ,the short lines between two points that are not in this case straight lines,for example in a sphere surface the geodesics are maximun circles or meridians.

In the following chapters the author tells the birth and evolution of the concept of neutron star and black holes by the work of Scharzschild,Chandrasekhar,Oppenheimer and others and the idea of the Hawking radiation. After this ,the search of astronomical black holes as result of imploding massive stars and the big black holes in the galactic nucleus,recently confirmed,also the search of gravitational waves,the last test of the theory and also recently confirmed.

Te book ends with two speculative subjects,the structure of the hipotetical singularity inside a black hole as a quantum space time foam as quantum gravity predicts and the existence of womholes in the spacetime sustained by exotic matter and its possible use for interestellar trips or time machines here the movie" Interestellar". Also other point of the book is the sociology of science,the science in USA versus soviet union and the history of the independent discovery of the Teller Ulam design of the termonuclear devices by Sajarov in the soviet union.

A reference book of popular science on relativity,black holes,wormholes,time machines and its history. May 24, Taha Ansari rated it it was amazing Shelves: pop-science. What a masterpiece!

Thoroughly detailed without being overly complicated. Kip Thorne, a recent Nobel laureate awarded for his immense contributions in gravitational wave detection, goes through the most important junctures in 20th century physical research, explaining along the way the most important concepts in relativistic physics. Do physical laws allow the formation of black holes and naked singularities? Kip Thorne approaches each question by first giving the general historical circumstances in which the theoretical and experimental efforts were at their peak world war two for instance and the international effort put into building and developing the atomic bomb , he then introduces the main characters involved, and what makes this book so unique, is that the author not only focuses on the final results of their endeavors, but instead shines as much light on the process, including the successes and the failures.

What also makes this book stand out, is the important implication of the author in most topics approached. He describes in detail the kinds of relationships that connect physicists including himself to other scientists Mathematicians, astrophysicists, etc.

And apparently physicists are keen on making bets For those who are wondering if this book is outdated, most explanations given in this book still remain valid, some of which have even been proven years after the book was published Gravitational waves for example.

Most importantly, this book is not only for those who want to expand their knowledge in relativistic physics, it is also a great demonstration of how scientific knowledge is built and a great source of historical information.

I cannot recommend it highly enough! Immediately after special relativity was accepted by the scientists, the mathematics predicted the existence of black holes. Thorne describes the initial scepticism until the embrace of the black hole concept later on. Besides that, he also describes the search for these objects and the later on developments in the black hole theory.

Accompanied with easy understandable illustrations, I was pleasantly surprised how well I could follow the concepts and understand them in a large degree. Not a small feat for such a difficult topic. Toward the end, Thorne deals with the more specalutative questions such as wormholes and time travel. This was nice to read, but not the main part of the book. All in all, I can surely recommend this book to anyone with an interest in science and astrology in particular.

May 04, Steve Walker rated it it was amazing Shelves: aero-astro , favorites , astronomy , history-of-science. Thorne would write a revision of the based on the recent discoveries made by the Hubbl This classic was first published in hardback in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Black Holes Kip Thorne is an eccentric author who reveals scientific enterprise of quantum gravity and black holes research in a simple language.

This book is rich in history, and classical Newtonian physics and theory of relativity and modern physics quantum mechanics are presented in non mathematical form.

We get rare first hand insights of scientific styles and temperament, and his personal involvement in various aspects of black holes research an Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Black Holes Kip Thorne is an eccentric author who reveals scientific enterprise of quantum gravity and black holes research in a simple language.

We get rare first hand insights of scientific styles and temperament, and his personal involvement in various aspects of black holes research and his interaction with scientists all over the world especially those from former Soviet Union and the impact of communism on black hole research.

The first part of the book describes theory of relativity, concept of spacetime fabric of the universe and curvature of spacetime in presence of matter stars, galaxies, etc.

The author gives us a good historical background to build his case for black hole concept. Theory of relativity predicts the existence of black holes but Einstein refused to accept it and so is Arthur Eddington another leading exponent of theory of relativity.

The idea of black holes remained in academic obscurity among few who believed in it and it progressively became clear that dying giant stars undergo implosions in which nuclear force the strongest of all four forces of cosmos buckles under gravitational force creating a blackholes. Black holes have been discovered in the center of dying giant stars and in centers of galaxies, and efforts are underway to detect the black hole gravitational waves carried to earth from distant parts of the universe and to seek the secret of what is inside a black hole: a route to another universe?

The author warps up the second part by discussing the possibility of constructing wormholes with exotic matter tunnels in space connecting two widely separated locations in the universe through hyperspace for interstellar travel and back to the future.

He is one of the leaders in proposing interstellar travel. Physicists and academics are too conservative to get involved in space travel research as it is traditionally linked to science fiction and Star Trek junkies. The author can mesmerize the reader with his incredible knowledge and ease with which he can communicate to the reader; at the same time he is eccentric enough to work in one of his laboratory Palomar Mountains nude and draw criticisms from peers.

He is also crazy enough to take bet with peers for things such as Penthouse magazine and annoy his wife and family with Mormon heritage. This book is free of marketing strategies of the publisher as the author shares his knowledge with the reader to his best of abilities to make everyone understands it even by offering few simple calculations and formulas. Do not be discouraged by the size of the book pages. The text flows well and it is deeply engrossing. Anyone interested in black hole and space travel must have this book.

View 1 comment. Jan 01, Whitney rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. I have always been interested in anything related to quantum physics. I didn't expect this to be an easy read but I didn't really expect to have any problem getting through it since I've been researching this type of stuff since I was in 8th grade. I underestimated this book. It's written in a way that's fairly easy to understand, but the theories themselves were giving me a hard time. If you are interested in learning more about black holes and time warps and are willing to reread every paragra I have always been interested in anything related to quantum physics.

If you are interested in learning more about black holes and time warps and are willing to reread every paragraph until you understand then I definitely recommend this book. Jun 05, Clif rated it really liked it Shelves: science. I had read Einstein's book "The Evolution of Physics" reviewed and with the introduction that he supplied, felt I was ready to fall into black holes.

I had seen a cover blurb describing Kip Thorne's book subtitle: Einstein's outrageous legacy as exemplary science writing and, though it is somewhat dated bought a used copy. Thorne wastes no time, initially taking the reader on a visit to black holes of various sizes, though widely separated in distance, in our galaxy. Relativity is seen I had read Einstein's book "The Evolution of Physics" reviewed and with the introduction that he supplied, felt I was ready to fall into black holes.

Relativity is seen by the wildly different amount of time experienced by the astronauts compared to that on earth during their absence. A trip to the center of the Milky Way at light speed would only be 30 years for the voyagers but many thousands of years would pass on earth, many thousands more for the return trip!

This a result of what Einstein found - that time is relative. There is no independent time, alike for everyone everywhere. Only the speed of light is constant everywhere and always. It is this adjustment of our dimensions of height, width and depth to accord with the constant of light speed that results in the weird stretching and compressing of objects and of time. The central theme of the book is gravity and what happens when it becomes far more powerful than we know it to be in our solar system.

Even as early as the 18th century there was speculation about what would happen if a star was so massive that its gravity would prevent even light from escaping. Thorne takes us on the investigation through physics that really took off after Einstein came up with the concept of spacetime, which is curved by gravity. Because spacetime is a dimension that we can never see, limited as we are to the 3 dimensions that we know, Thorne uses what are called embedding diagrams to give a sense of how curvature of spacetime can result in the three angles of a triangle summing to more or less than degrees, or the shortest distance between two points not being a straight line as we would see it.

The best way I've found to think of spacetime is as follows: light must always follow the shortest path between two points and it must do so at the fixed speed of , miles per second. Einstein showed that light has mass, though very little, and is therefor affected by gravity. The intense gravity of the sun is enough to bend the path of light that passes near it. If we look at the light of a star with high precision, we note that if the sun's edge passes near the position of that star, the star's light will be offset from where it would otherwise be, shifting the position of that star in relation to all the other stars seen in that part of the sky.

As the sun moves away, the distant star appears to move back into its normal place. Now, if light cannot change speed and must be coming to us from that distant star by the shortest path at all times, then it is the path, through Einstein's spacetime, that is distorted because of the sun's gravity. Were the sun a black hole, the distant star's light passing near it would be greatly displaced, just as the text in a book would be moved and distorted as you pass a magnifying lens over it.

Surprisingly, the author is able to make the strangeness he describes comprehensible. The idea that as stars become increasingly massive their fate takes them to different endpoints - white dwarfs, neutron stars and finally black holes, is clearly explained with many diagrams and side comments.

I only had difficulty in the last chapter where he goes into time machines. There, the level of abstraction went where I could not follow, and abstraction is what the cutting edge of physics is all about. You will get a great introduction to great minds in math and physics of the 20th century, many of them friends of Kip Thorne. There are plenty of personal accounts and a good bit of humor to humanize what might be a dry subject.

There is excellent coverage of the instruments used, such as the radio telescope or the X-ray detecting satellites. Thorne does a great job of catching the reader up in the excitement of the professionally curious who are forever asking why. Something I had not considered before, the author relates how traditional optical astronomy, starting with the naked eye, only reveals a relatively quiet universe.

The rip-roaring world of X-rays, gamma rays and gravity waves cannot be "seen" without special instruments that have only been practical within the last 75 years. An exciting part of the book for me was the story of Grote Reber, a hobbyist in Wheaton, Illinois, who built his own backyard radio telescope and detected with low precision strong radio sources before professional astronomers knew about them.

So impressive was his work that astronomers from the Yerkes Observatory traveled to visit him. Thorne takes you across the electromagnetic spectrum, from light through radio and X-rays up to the latest area of investigation, non-electromagnetic gravity waves, being sought as the inevitable result of black holes in collision.

Since Kip Thorne recommended the construction of the first gravity wave interferometer at Caltech, he's well placed to discuss the search.

Because of the age of this book, I was curious to see what happened with this particular project, called LIGO. As it happens, it was built and operated for several years but detected no gravity waves. It has been dismantled and a successor instrument is about to take up the search.

Black holes are discussed in great detail, as you'd expect, but not as you'd expect the discussion can be followed without difficulty through the decades, as one great mind after another puts up an idea to be either upheld against fierce criticism or destroyed by the math of another. Behind it all lies Einstein's relativity that opened up a chapter on the search for truth by minds that have to model places in the universe where matter and energy take on magnitudes unknown to human experience.

I had to chuckle when Thorne would describe untold hours and even years of work being upset like this: After X had been working on the problem, trying to tie together the different loose ends, Z showed that, after all, everything could be explained by looking at the math in a different way, that, really, there was no difficulty after all.

Join Kip Thorne for this inside story on what is real, though it may contradict our experience. There are more weird things in this book than in a carnival freak show, yet all of them have stood up to the best testing that has been devised. Mar 31, GridGirl rated it really liked it Shelves: owned.

He and his colleagues Barry Barish and Rainer Weiss have been honored for their contribution to the observation of gravitational waves. Thorne wrote this book in and therefore twenty-two years before t Kip Thorne, author of Black Holes and Time Warps , is one of three Nobel laureates for Physics of Thorne wrote this book in and therefore twenty-two years before they had first observed gravitational waves.

Nevertheless, the book goes into the general theory of gravitational waves and the process of developing a suitable observatory for these waves — all of this, without using complicated formulas or the like. This is a theme throughout the whole book. He uses analogies whenever the concepts get very complex.

In no way, shape or form you have to be a doctor of physics or anything like that to understand the general concepts of this book. On the contrary, it is a great way to dive a little deeper into the topic for everyone who likes documentaries about space or is into science-fiction in space. But nobody expects you to gulp down a page NF about physics in one sitting. The time it takes is very rewarding, because you educate yourself while getting a general idea about what has been going on in physics for the last years.

Jan 29, Karl rated it really liked it Shelves: scients , physics. In this book, Thorne tried to write a pop-science book giving the state of play in theoretical astrophysics in , so obviously a bit dated but at the same time making it accessible to the non-practitioner.

He presents the development of physics up to the then-present day in a combination of theoretical sidebars and some very basic mathematics held together by character sketches, anecdotes, and biographies of those involved.

My father bought this for me in about , just after I'd dropped o In this book, Thorne tried to write a pop-science book giving the state of play in theoretical astrophysics in , so obviously a bit dated but at the same time making it accessible to the non-practitioner. My father bought this for me in about , just after I'd dropped out of university. I read it cover to cover, twice, and came away with a combination of understanding and deep confusion - not from any problems with the delivery, but because the subject matter itself is deeply complex.

I have a terrible habit of skim-reading, which one definitely cannot do with books of this ilk. The topics within - particularly the sections on relativity and event diagrams - require the reader to spend some time turning them over in the mind to reach an intuitive understanding. They haven't. It's still an excellent book, although, as pointed out earlier, somewhat dated. Nonetheless Thorne's writing has a comfortable, informal style and, as a semi-auto -biographical work on the most influential physicists of the last century, this book is well worth a look.

Jul 31, Peter Tillman rated it it was amazing Shelves: sci-tech. Kip Thorne, the Feynman Professor of Physics at Caltech, is best known to the general public for his wormhole "time machine" proposal. Press coverage included a photo of the author doing physics in the nude on Mt. The wormhole work grew out of a request from Carl Sagan for a plausible FTL transport scheme for his science-fiction novel Contact which I recommend.

Sagan's request made Thorne realize the value of thought experiment Kip Thorne, the Feynman Professor of Physics at Caltech, is best known to the general public for his wormhole "time machine" proposal. Sagan's request made Thorne realize the value of thought experiments that ask, "What things do the laws of physics permit an infinitely advanced civilization to do, and what do the laws forbid? Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away. Get books you want. Ask yourself: Does it really matter what others think about me?

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It provides an illustrated overview of the history and development of black hole theory, from its roots in Newtonian mechanics until the early s. Over fourteen chapters, Thorne proceeds roughly chronologically, tracing first the crisis in Newtonian physics precipitated by the Michelson—Morley experimentand the subsequent development of Einstein's theory of special relativity given mathematical rigor in the form of Minkowski spaceand later Einstein's incorporation of gravity into the framework of general relativity. Black holes were quickly recognized as a black holes and time warps pdf free download solution of Einstein's field equationsblack holes and time warps pdf free download were rejected as physically implausible by most physicists. Work by Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar suggested that collapsing stars beyond a certain mass cannot be supported by degeneracy pressurebut this result was challenged by the more prestigious Arthur Stanley Eddingtonand was not fully accepted for several decades. When the reality of objects which possess an event horizon finally achieved broad acceptance, the stage was set holew a thorough investigation into the properties black holes and time warps pdf free download such objects, yielding the surprising result that black holes have no hair —that is, that their properties are entirely determined by their mass, spin rate, and electrical charge. Proceeding separately from theoretical research into relativity, and black holes and time warps pdf free download the refinement of radio astronomyastrophysics began to produce unusual observations of extremely intense radio sources, which were xnd located outside of the Milky Way. In consultation with theoretical physicists, it became apparent that the only sensible explanation for these sources were a head full of dreams album download free black holes and time warps pdf free download black holes residing in the cores of galaxies, producing intense radiation as they fed and, in the case of quasarsholws out incredibly powerful jets of material in opposite directions, heating the surrounding galactic gas until it glowed in radio frequencies. Thorne describes the much less mature search for black holes and time warps pdf free download wavesphenomena predicted to result from supernovae and black hole collisions, but as yet unobserved in and, indeed, not directly observed untila discovery that led to Thorne being awarded a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics. In the s came Stephen Hawking 's hooes prediction of black hole evaporation, powered by quantum black holes and time warps pdf free download near the event horizon. Toward the end of the text, Thorne deals with the much more speculative question of the nature of the core of a black hole; the so-called gravitational singularity predicted by Einstein's field equations. By introducing quantum behavior to curved spacetimeseveral physicists have suggested that black holes do not possess a true mathematical singularity, but rather a region of chaotic space, in which time does not exist. The behavior of this space and the material which approaches it are not well understood, with a complete marriage of relativity and quantum physics yet to be achieved. In the final chapter, Thorne delves into even more speculative matters relating to black hole physics, including the existence and nature of wormholes and time machines. The book features a foreword by Stephen Hawking and an introduction by Frederick Seitz. In addition to the main text, the book provides biographical summaries of the major scientists in the text, a chronology of key events in the history of black hole physics, a glossary of technical terms, twenty-three pages of notes, a bibliography, and alphabetical indices of subjects and people referred to in the text. Of the book, The New Hlack Times wrote, "the close and sometimes difficult reasoning it embodies is lightened by a deft, anecdotal approach, and by the author's whimsical drawings and b,ack. Thorne in fact is strongest for the novice reader when dealing with 8 mile full movie free no download english history of the physics community". From Wikipedia, black holes and time warps pdf free download free encyclopedia. Dewey Decimal. black holes and time warps pdf free download JO BLACK HOLES AND TIME WARPS The singularity and the stellar matter locked up in it are And the job left free half his waking hours and all weeke11d. Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy (Commonwealth Fund Book Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy. Kip S. Thorne Vitaly Ginzburg, Reviewer. P. N. Lebedev Institute, Moscow. PDF Free first page. For an object of a given mass, the spacetime curvature increases as its size decreases. [Figure from Thorne's “Black Holes and time warps”]. and two jets emerging from the hole's vicinity. [From K.S. Thorne,. Black Holes and Time Warps (Norton, ).] Warped Spacetime Around a Black Hole. What is. Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy. Kip Thorne, with foreword by Stephen Hawking. Over the last hundred years, human understanding. Black Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy is a popular science book by physicist Kip Thorne. It provides an illustrated overview of the. Let's fight back coronavirus. About Us. We believe everything in the internet must be free. So this tool was designed for free download documents from the internet. Black Holes & Time Warps book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Ever since Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. This has turned out to be a perfect way to start my new year along with the wonderful discoveries of gravitational waves from merging black holes and neutron stars in the last couple of years. Thorne, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at Caltech, leads his readers through an elegant, always human, tapestry of interlocking themes, coming finally to a uniquely informed answer to the great question: what principles control our universe and why do physicists think they know the things they think they know? Black Holes - Thorne.. Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time has been one of the greatest best-sellers in publishing history. He was the first American to learn of the discovery of nuclear fission, later coined the term "black hole," led a renaissance in gravitation physics, and helped to build Princeton University into a mecca for physicists. April This site was designed with the. Thorne was one of a group of physicists who fought hard to keep Russian and American scientists in contact during the Cold War. January Growing out of a full-year course that the eminent researchers Kip Thorne and Roger Blandford taught at Caltech for almost three decades, this book is designed to broaden the training of physicists. He is the winner of a lot of the very good awards due to his amazing work. In this masterfully written and brilliantly informed work of scientific history and explanation, Dr. John Archibald Wheeler's fascinating life brings us face to face with the central characters and discoveries of modern physics. He is also crazy enough to take bet with peers for things such as Penthouse magazine and annoy his wife and family with Mormon heritage. With two remarkable ideas, Albert Einstein revolutionized our view of the Universe. black holes and time warps pdf free download